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Cheryl K. Chumley

Counterfeit vaccine cards will lead to total government surveillance

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US Customs and Border Patrol announced its officers at a port in Alaska recently seized thousands of fake COVID-19 vaccination cards that came from China.

The seizure opens the door for government to go forward with the technological tracking of US citizens. How so?

It strengthens the arguments of pro-vaccine passport types who say Americans must be vaccinated, or else risk infecting the innocent; that Americans must prove vaccination as conditions of associating freely in public and interacting with others; that vaccine passports are obviously the easiest means by which proof of vaccination can be displayed; but that paper vaccine passports are vulnerable to counterfeit. A smartphone app that carries a scannable electronic code tied directly to the carrier’s medical records — connected directly to the clinic or doctor’s office that administered the shot — is the viable alternative. So will go the line of logic. See, see? — they’ll say: Paper passports are prone to fakery. We need something more secure. We need something technologically advanced.

In fact, this is the alternative that’s already being tested in select spots, by select tech companies.
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The Two Americas: Collectivists vs. Individualists

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CNN just ran an opinion piece with the headline, “Can you do something about stubborn unvaccinated people? Yes, you can.” The New York Times ran a similarly themed opinion piece a few weeks earlier with this headline, “Meet the Four Kinds of People Holding Us Back.” So did The Washington Post — only harsher in tone: “I’m tired of being nice to vaccine refusers,” the writer complained just a few days ago.

The message is clear: The unvaccinated are to blame. The oft-unstated message, though, is just as clear, at least for those paying attention: America’s pesky penchant for individualism is to blame.

After all, a country steeped in collectivism wouldn’t have this problem — wouldn’t have to deal with naysayers, with doubting Thomases, with critical thinkers and questioning pains in the you-know-what, with rebels both with and without causes. A country that takes its marching orders from government, filled with citizens who are trained from Day One to rely on, even pine for, dictates from their political overlords — a country like that filled with citizens like this simply obeys. They take the COVID-19 shot. They take the shot and move on, and nary a complaint is heard. Perhaps they’re afraid of disappearing into the good night; perhaps they’re afraid of being arrested or shot; but in the end, no matter the reason, nary a complaint is heard.
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CDC — shh! — has a COVID shot ‘heart inflammation’ emergency

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will hold an “emergency meeting” of advisers to talk about the higher-than-expected numbers of young men who’ve experienced heart inflammation after taking doses of the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines against coronavirus. Shh!

That is, after taking doses of the entirely experimental, never-before-approved-for-use-in-any-disease mRNA vaccines against coronavirus.

Remember, these vaccines are labeled “emergency use authorization” for a reason. And that reason is the side effects, both short-term and long-term, and most definitely longest-haul-term, are completely unknown.

That means those who take the vaccine are taking one for the government. They’re taking a chance that the government is giving them chemicals that help, not harm. They’re trusting that when the bureaucrats in the government say they’re here to help, that they’re honestly, truly, irrefutably and undeniably, cross-their-fingers-hope-to-die here to help.
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COVID-19 Vaccine Status a Private Affair

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A poll from Morning Consult earlier this month found that vaccinated Americans are more afraid than the unvaccinated to eat inside a restaurant, travel outside the United States or go to the gym to work out — an astonishing discovery given that the whole reason for getting the vaccine is, drumroll, please, to prevent getting COVID-19.

But this poll explains a lot.

Like why perfect strangers think it’s A-OK to ask if you’ve had a vaccine, if you are planning to get the vaccine, and if not, why not. They’re not at all polite about it, either.

“It is ethical to ask if someone is vaccinated?” The Philadelphia Inquirer inquired. “That would be a hard no, says Sally Scholz, chair and professor of philosophy at Villanova University. … This is a medical issue and, ethically, it’s never OK to ask someone about their health status; in essence, you are asking someone to divulge sensitive information about their medical history that they may be uncomfortable sharing.”

Quite right.

And yet.

And yet that’s a truth that’s being rapidly pushed to the side in this brave new coronavirus world.

Remember the days when personal medical and health decisions stayed personal?
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Anthony Fauci and his faux science sow more seeds of fear

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Dr. Anthony Fauci, the White House’s go-to for all things coronavirus, said on Sunday on national news that even those who’ve been vaccinated should not gather indoors, or eat indoors, or remove their masks — or basically, in essence, do anything that involves being and breathing around others.

This guy will have Americans walking on pins and needles, living in fear, forever — if we let him.

His so-called supporting science is about as solid as tossing a coin. Heads, stay at home; tails, don’t go outside. Heads, wear a face mask; tails, wear two face masks.

MSNBC host Mehdi Hasan asked him, “What is the message to vaccinated and unvaccinated Americans as to what they should and should not be doing right now? For example, eating and drinking indoors in restaurants and bars — is that OK now?”

And Fauci’s answer?

Nope.

“It’s still not OK for the simple reason that the level of infection, the dynamics of infection in the community, are still really disturbingly high,” said, Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. “Like just yesterday there were close to 80,000 new infections, and we’ve been hanging around 60,000, 70,000, 75,000.”
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Israel's Troubling 'Green Pass' Post-Coronavirus System

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Israel is almost completely opened for business. But to participate in the post-coronavirus bustle, you need a Green Pass, a government-sanctioned document that says the carrier has been vaccinated.

And that’s troubling, to say the least. 

This post-coronavirus world is more and more moving to be all about the collective, zero about the individual.

According to a report in The New York Times, individuals who show a Green Pass — the government’s downloadable special OK for the vaccinated — can stay in hotels, dine inside restaurants, attend events of mass gatherings, to include religious services and sports’ games, visit places of tourism and cultural significance, gather for weddings and funerals, work out in fitness centers, swim in swimming pools, vacation in crowded places and more. 

Those without the pass?

Maybe not.

Maybe they have to stay home.
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Dr. Seuss Censorship Sets Impossible Standard

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If Dr. Seuss is the standard by which all authors are to be judged, make way for the book burnings.

And bring lots of firewood.

Because if Dr. Seuss and his cartoonish characters can’t pass the anti-racism muster of the faces of the left, how can Mark Twain’s “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn,” or Laura Ingalls Wilder’s “Little House on the Prairie” series, or J.M. Barrie’s “Peter Pan,” each with their own set of perceived and real stereotypes and slurs? Even Roald Dahl’s original “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory” has inspired criticism over the depiction of the Oompa Loompas as jungle-dwellers. Let’s not forget Margaret Mitchell’s “Gone With the Wind,” in all its slavery glory, or Charles Dickens’ “Oliver Twist,” in all its anti-Semitic glory, or Lynne Reid Banks’ “The Indian in the Cupboard,” in all its — well, the title speaks volumes on that one, yes?

The list is endless.

The list can be endless.

Even the Bible speaks to the enslavement of various peoples.

Are we to turn off all the offensive to our ears, in some sort of — futile — attempt to whitewash, er, erase, not just history, but fancy and fiction and flights of imaginations?
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DC Military Occupation Not a Good Look for America

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Concerns over “civil disturbance” have led the powers-who-be in Washington, DC, to extend the stay of members of the National Guard in the nation’s capital city.

A military occupation in America — who knew.

Military troops are not law enforcement officers. Nor should they be treated as such. The first is designed for war; the second, for fighting crime. Mixing the two can have disastrous results for citizens’ rights.

The mindsets are completely different.

“Police killing more likely in agencies that get military gear,” the Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported in October. “Hardware designed for war exerts subtle pressure on police culture, experts say.”

That’s just common sense.

Police armed with assault-style rifles, decked in black uniforms with thick black vests and topped with military metal helmets, stationed atop armored vehicles and surveilling crowds with night vision goggles — who wouldn’t feel the power while wearing such gear?
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